How to Determine if Nutritional Information is Trustworthy

cooking, food, health, keto, ketogenic, nutrition

KetOMAD

In a world inundated with food blogs, and vlogs, and celebrities trying to sell us things, it can be overwhelming to try to find any real science about what we should be eating. And as a man known for his efficiency, I’m going to cut right to the chase. No one knows. Seriously, science is only just beginning to get an understanding of the relationship between our bodies and food. But there are some things that are known with more certainty than others, and it is possible for the average person to evaluate data without needing a medical degree.

The scary thing is, you can’t even trust supposedly reliable sources, for example, Monash University who devised the low FODMAP diet definitely know their stuff when it comes to FODMAPs, but seem to have very antiquated ideas about nutrition overall. Their FODMAP diet app pushes the idea of eating a “balanced…

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Google Misinformation: Fake News Medicine

I am not a free-speech lawyer, but when human health is at stake, perhaps search engines, social media platforms and websites should be held responsible for promoting or hosting fake information.

Haider Warraich, a fellow in heart failure and transplantation at Duke University Medical Center, is the author of the forthcoming “State of the Heart: Exploring the History, Science, and Future of Cardiac Disease.”

Fake news vs fact in online battle for truth

Since US President Donald Trump weaponised the term “fake news” during the 2016 presidential election campaign, the phrase has gone viral.

Increasingly it is used by politicians around the world to denounce or dismiss news reports that do not fit their version of the truth.

But as news outlets defend their work, false information is saturating the political debate worldwide and undermining an already weak level of trust in the media and institutions.

The term has come to mean anything from a mistake to a parody or a deliberate misinterpretation of facts.

At the same time, misinformation online is increasingly visible in attempts to manipulate elections.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-12-fake-news-fact-online-truth.html