Fake news front group “NewsGuard” exposed as a massive protection racket to promote fake narratives from official sources while censoring indy media

Facebook, Media, Politics

The Net Projection

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Image credit: Nowtheendbegins

Vicki Batts

NewsGuard Technologies promotes itself as a company bent on fighting “fake news” and allowing truth to prevail. The website claims the company will restore “trust and accountability” through its human-driven rating system. But as many critics have suspected, the onslaught of pro-NewsGuard propaganda is a ploy to deceive the public and normalize censorship. NewsGuard doesn’t care about the truthfulness of reporting; it is a shell company with the explicit purpose of silencing the independent media and securing the establishment’s place at the top of the journalism food chain.

In a new partnership with Microsoft, NewsGuard will be installed automatically with Microsoft’s web browser, Edge. And according to reports, NewsGuard wants to see its “technology” applied to every device sold in the United States. Mass censorship is on our doorsteps, and virtually every major news outlet in the U.S. is promoting it.

NewsGuard or…

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The Danger of Certainty

change , close minded , fake news , open minded , perspective , point of view , right , truth , wrong

“It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.”

Mark Twain

It’s hard to change somebody’s mind. It’s even harder to change our own. We are constantly bombarded by information, which morphs and shifts, adding and losing convenient and inconvenient details according to the storyteller’s perspective. Truth is lost when it’s perceived as lies, and fiction is accepted at face value with little or no scrutiny, if it aligns with the listeners preconceived point of view.

“The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow-witted man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him. ”

Tolstoy

I would hope that every person…

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The Fight Against Fake News

Nicholas C. Rossis

Fake news | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksIf you haven’t heard the term “fake news” yet, please come out from under that rock and join the rest of us. As for the rest, you will no doubt be aware that fake news has been linked to extremist politics, social division, mob violence, and crime.

As writers, we know the power of words. That’s why I’m sharing some interesting news on fake news and the moves against it, courtesy of Mike Elgan and Computer World.

Who’s to blame?

Old people. No, seriously. A new study found that Facebook users over the age of 65 are far more likely to share fake news than younger users. The reasons for this include a lack of digital media literacy by people who didn’t grow up with the internet and age-related cognitive decline.

China’s WeChat found similar results on that network and also concluded that country folk are more likely to share…

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How to sit back and enjoy the FAKE NEWS

fowc , fpq , blogging , creative writing , fake news , globalist , life , nwo , world news

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Question by FPQ: “How do you feel about people who always seem to exaggerate when relating a story? Do you equate embellishment with lying? As a blogger, when, if ever, is stretching the truth, other than when writing fiction, permissible?”

Also, the word of the day from FOWC is “NEWS.”

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Think about how dull the news stories would be without the adjectives used by the writers. Depending on the reader and their wants and needs one would grade the news as being exaggerated or “right on,” lying or just creative writing. The reader who loves the truth will read as they say, “between the lines.” In other words, what is meant by something that is not written! The creative genius of the writer by their embellishment can very easily falsify or misrepresent the truth, by their use of semantics of words.

Semantics is one weapon engineers of the…

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reading vs listening

# School of Greatness, # Shane Parrish, #freaknomics, #Lewis Howes, #listening, #podcast, #The Knowledge Podcast, Evernote, reading, Tim Ferris

100to500

Over the past few days, I have been listening to some really awesome podcasts, mostly from Shane Parrish’s The Knowledge Podcast. I must admit, I am somewhat kicking myself that I did not discover this podcast and a few others earlier. Shane’s podcast is especially great because it is the equivalent to the long form blogs posts or like reading a novella which is somewhere between a short story and a full-fledged novel in the sense that it is interesting enough while also being short enough that one can read it in today’s world of multiple distractions. One of the reasons I took up listening to podcasts was of course everyone raving about how many of them were awesome but also because when I am doing a physical activity, where I earlier used to listen to music, I thought it might be beneficial to listen to a podcast instead…

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If You Hate Reading, Read This

introduction , liberation , science , sessions , theory , wide world change , 3 new priorities

Dear Harvey

Read in a session. Take a rational text like RC or math or physics. Emotional or distress texts are often harder to read. Take your time discharging. It will make that you become good at reading. And fond of it.

If you have enough free attention to listen, you can read. Try to realize what you read.

And it can become fun and a skill you’re good at, by experience and discharge.

You don’t need the distress that makes it hard to read. Chuck it!

Through reading, you will learn so much, so fast!

Begin by reading slowly but precisely. Don’t worry about the speed. That will come with practice. (But if you begin with fast and imprecise reading, you will never really read what it says.)

In the beginning, reading one copy of Present Time took me three months, every three months. I was a

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